I mean, really. Look at this whacky combination of flowers, tiger stripe and chains.

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But still, there was something about it that I really liked. And not just the fact that it was a really lovely soft merino wool – the kind that’s normally rather expensive. Although apparently the moths liked it too:

holey merino sweater

Lots of tiny little holes! But I’ll deal with those later. Firstly, I’m gonna cut a bit of length off, and use my overlocker to take care of the raw edge.  (This also got rid of quite a few holes!)

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Then I made a cut straight up the centre, and again made with the overlocking.

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That green fabric you see in the middle there is me testing to see what I can use to finish the edges. This shiny turquoise lycra was bought at the same time as the chiffon I used in this top – they match perfectly, and I cannot for the life of me remember what I was planning on making!

It worked for this sweater (well, better than anything else in my stash) so I cut a couple of strips and used it to bind the centre front edges.

The hem I folded up about 1cm, pressed, and then hand-sewed. Then I got out my darning needle and did some repair work!

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They’re not perfect, but they’re also not particularly obvious, and the holes will now not fray or enlarge.  I did have to spend $1.25 on some embroidery thread as I didn’t have anything even close to this colour – and of course when I went to the fabric store I forgot to take my offcut so I could match the shade! I had to do it from memory alone. I think I did okay, actually. Does anyone else find handsewing to be kind of therapeutic? Especially darning; it’s very satisfying to see a little hole become a cute little repair.

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So the sweater cost me $5 and the embroidery thread $1.25 – total of $6 for a cosy cardigan that I have worn to work already (where it passed the warmth test – I’m always cold in the office, but this cardy kept the chill off perfectly.)

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What do you think? Still too daggy? 🙂

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